Saturday, May 06, 2006

SHINING OF CRICKETERS ORIGINATED FROM SUBCONTINENT ( INDIA?PAKISTAN) IN WORLD CRICKET

Last week was a shining day for people of sub continent origin in South Africa. Hashim Amla the religious muslim cricketer from Natal had a wonderful second birth in tests having scored a briliant 149 against Kiwis. In the same match, Kiwi of Indian descent, Jeetan Patel made an impressive debut.
In the WI, against oll odds prevailing for an Indo carribean to be an established player, Ganga, Sarwan and Ramdin's names were in fore front for the captains berth after shivnaraine chanderpaul resigned from the exalted position.
Our very own Monty is a house hold name in England. A lot of players of Pakistani descent are in line for recognition in England. England's lost glory was achieved under Indian born Nasser Hussain.
Indian communities are excelling in almost all spheres in countries they have settled in. Carribean was the worst place for many as having originated from Jahajis. They were in between the racial divide of both white and black rulers. Today they are comming forward in large numbers.
World's best off spinner Murali is descendent of indentured labourers in SL. It is a pleasure to see them all shining. This idea generated in me after reading this emailed article of Peter Roebuke on Indian diaspora cricketers.Just read it and enjoy.
Indian crick is rising to glory
•Sat, 6 May 2006By Peter Roebuck
Members of the Indian cricket communities around the cricketing world continue to press ahead. India has been mad on the game ever since cravat-clad soldiers and toupeed traders from the old country first started playing cover drives on the maidans of Bombay and Calcutta. India embraced the culture of the game, with its white clothes and codes and clapping, and did not let its enthusiasm wane even during the sieges and mutual massacres that marked the fight for independence. Sooner or later Indian settlers were bound to start making their mark. After all they brought cricket with them across the oceans, alongside samosas, shawls and shrill songs. For an unconscionable time the communities were held back by their positions as indentured labour and so forth. After all they had travelled to find work in the fields and had little time for niceties such as games. Sensing hostility, too, the various groupings of Indian origin retreated into their own families and areas. Not for several generations did the settlers leave these shelters with the boldness and numbers needed to make their world pay attention. Large self-supporting communities developed in countries like England and South Africa, and they remained hidden. Happily the current generation (and therefore also their parents because Indians listen to their progenitors, and sometimes even like them, in a way unfashionable elsewhere) has found the confidence needed to step out. As might have been expected, KwaZulu-Natal and England have been the main beneficiaries of this surge in self-esteem. Arguably the West Indies ought by now to have appointed Indians as their captain and vice-captain. Starting at home, it has obviously been a satisfactory week for the Amlas. Displaying the calmness that eludes fellow believers as they seek to replace humour and debate with their own grimness, Hashim took his chance and deserves a long run in the side. Watching the ball closely, resembling one of those Victorian cricketers in whose beards birds used to nest and playing mostly off the back foot, the capable 23-year-old constructed a convincing innings and New Zealand found him hard to remove. Clearly the selectors deserve praise for their boldness in replacing older hands with youngsters with some petrol in the tank. Previously inclined towards the exotic, Amla has tightened his game and improved his footwork. Above all he has a discerning mind and can concentrate. Cricketers must focus on the next ball. It is not as easy as it sounds. Meanwhile, the KZN Dolphins named his brother Ahmed as their next captain. Admittedly our provincial outfit gets through captains at a rate others reserve for lightbulbs. Nevertheless it is a significant appointment for a rising player widely regarded as talented but tentative. By all accounts Ahmed is a genial cove, more likely than his younger brother to be heard singing along to Mr Eminem’s latest outpouring. Captaincy may be the making of him. At last, too, the Indian communities in the north and midlands of England are putting their turbans into the ring. Previously their contribution was limited to guest appearances from Anglo-Indians and occasional exotics, like Ranjtsinjhi, his ill-fated nephew Duleepsinjhi and the elder Nawab of Pataudi (who did not think much of bodyline). Now Monty Panaseer, Vikram Solanki, Kabir Ali and others have secured places in the side. Moreover, the rising “ Indian” contingent includes batsmen, spinners and pacemen. Injuries to numerous fast bowlers has opened the door even wider and a chap called Saiid Mohammed is under consideration for the forthcoming encounter with Sri Lanka. A scan of the county scores reveals more regional names. These days an emerging batsman is as likely to be called Alok Mankad as Brian Bolus. These players must feel as comfortable in English cricket as black Africans in Premier Division soccer. Numbers have a power of their own. Now it is West Indies’ turn to make the most of the great cricketing gift bestowed by the subcontinent. Shivnarine Chanderpaul’s inevitable resignation as captain of a team he could not control paved the way for the appointment of Ramnaresh Sarwan with the impressive young keeper/batsman Dinesh Ramdin as his deputy. Instead the West Indian Board returned to Brian Lara for a third time which, as someone said of second marriages, was “a triumph of hope over experience”. Presumably Lara was chosen with the World Cup in mind. His nomination has been earned more by words than deeds. After staging their World Cup in 2007, West Indies will need to take a leap that has proved difficult in many places, not least Fiji, of empowering an immigrant community. Radio commentator Fazir Mohammed says that Trinidad politics is not conducted along ethnic lines. That Tony Cosier and Ian Bishop remain respected voices in West Indian cricket is also encouraging. But it is a long and rocky road. Evidently progress has been made among cricket’s Indian communities. Turning their backs on the politicking and racism that marked previous generations, the current crop are showing the combination of determination and audacity needed to take their gift to its fulfilment. Long may it last. •

International cricket columnist PETER ROEBUCK is based in the KZN midlands peter@peterroebuck.com.Published: 6 May 2006

http://www.witness.co.za/default.asp?myAction=detail&myRef=43028&myCat=sport

5 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

What a great site, how do you build such a cool site, its excellent.
»

19 May, 2006 17:17  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I'm impressed with your site, very nice graphics!
»

19 May, 2006 18:10  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Great site lots of usefull infomation here.
»

19 May, 2006 18:19  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I love your website. It has a lot of great pictures and is very informative.
»

19 May, 2006 18:23  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

What a great site, how do you build such a cool site, its excellent.
»

19 May, 2006 18:30  

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home

Google
 
Web Ranjan's sikh and cricket blog